Tagged: Public History

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LGBT+ Public History: ‘Queering’ Museums and Archives

As explored in Jack’s introductory article, the history of sexuality is a problematic endeavour. The historical contingency of sexual identities renders quests to ‘reclaim’ an LGBT+ past problematic. In an attempt to avoid imposing the categories of gender and sexuality of our contemporary world onto the past, historians have focused...

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Public history: can we capture where the magic happens?

Universities are increasingly held accountable for the research they undertake, justifying the use of public funds. However, it is just as important for individual scholars, such as those in History, to consider the impact of our work. Can we be more creative in reflecting on our own contributions? And can...

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HTTP Turns 2: Making HTTP Great Again

Yesterday our blog turned two! If it was a child, it would be asking “Why?” all the time; be able to walk, run, and jump with both feet; and, most importantly, climb furniture (instead, we have Muz for that). Last year, we were still learning how to crawl. As a...

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Historical Sightseeing in Today’s Warsaw

Warsaw, like Berlin, is one of those cities where you cannot ignore the recent past. Nearly razed to the ground during World War II, rebuilt in haste under Soviet rule and now buzzing with shops, cafés and restaurants, modern history is all around. But what do today’s tourists actually see...

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Remembering the Cuban Missile Crisis: A UCL Workshop

Earlier this month I attended a history workshop at UCL on memories of the Cuban Missile Crisis. For thirteen precarious days in October 1962 the world was a hair’s breadth away from nuclear war, and subsequent memories of the event have shaped the way in which nuclear issues are discussed...

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Bearing Witness to the Witness: On Visual Representations of War

Images, in J.T Mitchell’s words, both ‘stand for and act as symptoms of what they signify’. The often betrayed expectation that visual representations of war can change public perceptions illustrates this paradox. Images of conflict take no side but they are capitalized on (for legitimation purposes) by all parties involved....

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The Day Human Character Changed

On or about June 2016, human character changed, and I finally understood the meaning of postmodernism. When I emerged from the Underground at Tottenham Court Road, navigating the sea of black umbrellas towards the British Museum, I felt it. There was a hush, a heightened British reserve, as the men...