Tagged: Nazi Germany

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Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Perpetration, Complicity and Collaboration: Conference Report

On 21 October 2016, the Centre for Collective Violence, Holocaust and Genocide Studies at UCL, with the support of the IAS Octagon Small Grants Fund, organised the one-day workshop on ‘Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Perpetration, Complicity, and Collaboration in Nazi-dominated Europe’. In the past two decades, research into perpetrators, collaborators, and...

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Cinema and History: Leisure Meets Politics

Although the value of film as a primary historical source has long been recognised, especially in light of progress made in digitization techniques, such material is often overlooked in favour of ‘traditional’ documents. With the growth of cinema as a popular leisure time activity from the beginning of the 20th...

hitler youth generation research 1

Researching the Hitler Youth generation

What is it like to be researching the Hitler Youth generation? I’m two years into my PhD; I’ve written and re-written around 45,000 words at this point. I’m approaching the halfway point of the thesis (say what?!). Whenever my friends or family ask me what I’m doing/what I think I’m...

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Complex women in Nazi propaganda?: Femininity in Das Deutsche Mädel magazine

Claudia Koonz questions in her book, Mothers in the Fatherland, why girls accepted the ‘misogyny endemic in’ the Nazi party. Koonz does not provide an answer to this, but the question is often on my mind as I am doing research on post-war life narratives of the Hitler Youth generation....

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Can We Understand History Through Fiction?

This holiday I read Anthony Doerr’s Pulitzer Prize winning novel,  All the Light We Cannot See (2014). The book centres around two characters: Werner, a German Nazi youth, and Marie-Laure, a blind French girl. The two face the imminent Second World War from their respective, opposing sides. While Doerr’s work...

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Lost Worlds: Reviving Nostalgia for German Central Europe?

Whether it is remembered as the ‘lost German East’ or as an idealised, multicultural region like Galicia, Germans and Austrians have a complicated relationship with Central Europe. As the locus of German culture and crimes, Austrian and German nostalgia for German Central Europe is often regarded with suspicion — if...

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What did the Nazis believe in?

Religion in Nazi Germany is not often discussed, but it played an important role in the way the Nazi party and German society viewed and understood their everyday lives. My research involves looking into a specific generation, the Hitler Youth generation, who were children born around 1929 in Nazi Germany....