Tagged: book review

Composite feature image for the book 'Prime Minister Corbyn' 0

The Best Leaders We’ve Never Had? A Review of ‘Prime Minister Corbyn’

As we have discussed on this site before, counterfactual history is a very useful, yet undervalued tool of historical analysis. When taken seriously, it offers a unique instrument for measuring the impact of particular events, decisions or personalities, by enabling historians to construct realities in which they did not exist or...

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Book Review: Michael Brenner’s Israel

Is Israel a state like any other? This is the controversial question that the famous German historian of Jewish history, Michael Brenner, has set out to answer in his latest book Israel. As you would expect, the history of Israel is highly contentious – prone to excessive politicisation, polemical debate...

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A review of Martin Mevius’ ‘Agents of Moscow’

As we have discussed before, the link between nationalism and communism has often been misconstrued by historians and social scientists alike over the past quarter century. While the two are theoretically incompatible, in practice they are often mutually dependent, and no communist state has ever been able to dispense with...

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A Review of Julie Summers’ ‘Fashion on the Ration’

Julie Summers is fast establishing herself as the voice of World War Two’s ‘Home Front’. Fashion on the Ration builds on the success of Summers’ Jambusters, which tells the story of the Women’s Institute during World War Two. She explores the wear and tear of the war years in Britain...

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Scholarly Review: E. H. Carr’s ‘The Romantic Exiles’

It’s a strange thing to review a historical study that is itself long in the tooth. Though E.H. Carr is a colossus in the history of, well, history itself, a sceptic might argue that his approach is outdated, his research methods unreliable, and his insights already surpassed. Indeed, Carr was...

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‘Playing with the Past’ and the interplay of history and video games (book review)

For a lifelong fan of video games, who has more recently transmogrified into an aspiring historian, the chance to review this book was too good to pass up. As its title suggests, ‘Playing with the Past’ brings together a collection of essays on the ways in which games present, discuss and promote...