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Book Review: Michael Brenner’s Israel

Is Israel a state like any other? This is the controversial question that the famous German historian of Jewish history, Michael Brenner, has set out to answer in his latest book Israel. As you would expect, the history of Israel is highly contentious – prone to excessive politicisation, polemical debate...

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The History of Responsibility in Jacques Derrida’s The Gift of Death

What does it mean to be responsible? This is a question which comes comes undone in Jacques Derrida’s The Gift of Death, which demonstrates that the history of responsibility …. since being responsible to a particular other entails prioritizing that other over countless others, it follows that responsibility to the...

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National Redefinitions Amid Shifting Boundaries: The German–Polish Border in Context

Unsurprisingly, the establishment of the new German–Polish border at Potsdam in 1945 had a lasting and inflammatory impact on relations between the two peoples. More profound, however, was the way in which it shaped the internal political and social development of both Poland and the emergent German Democratic Republic (GDR)....

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Public history: can we capture where the magic happens?

Universities are increasingly held accountable for the research they undertake, justifying the use of public funds. However, it is just as important for individual scholars, such as those in History, to consider the impact of our work. Can we be more creative in reflecting on our own contributions? And can...

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Let’s Talk About Studying, Baby!

Do you find that quite often you’re unable to study for unknown reasons? Always distracted? Struggle to prioritise? Then look no further as History to the Public has heeded your call. As students ourselves we have literally ‘been there, done that’. In fact we’re still there, and we’re still doing...

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Reluctant Heritage? Revisiting museums and memory sites in Central and Eastern Europe

The conference Reluctant Heritage:  Revisiting museums and memory sites in Central and Eastern Europe from a transnational perspective, which took place in Bucharest from 4–5 November 2016 associated with the international research project ‘Museums and Controversial Collections’, questioned the role of museums and memory sites in a post-dictatorial context. We...

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From History to Marketing!

Humble Beginnings When I was growing up (I know, I know, I’m 24 and still a child), I was fascinated by history. My eldest sister brought me the complete Horrible Science box-set, and not even that was enough to stop me from reading the Horrible Histories at my school library....

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Imperial rivalry and the story of Europe’s grand shopping streets

Today, Regent Street is one of the most iconic streets in London, known for imposing neoclassical buildings built along a sweeping curve that houses an international blend of shops and attracts an international blend of customers. Equally famous is Paris’s Rue de Rivoli, a long avenue of shops stretching from...

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HTTP Turns 2: Making HTTP Great Again

Yesterday our blog turned two! If it was a child, it would be asking “Why?” all the time; be able to walk, run, and jump with both feet; and, most importantly, climb furniture (instead, we have Muz for that). Last year, we were still learning how to crawl. As a...

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Should we freeze out the skater behind the ‘Holocaust on ice’?

Several weeks ago a storm of controversy broke over the head of Tatiana Navka, a Russian former Olympic ice skater and the wife of Vladimir Putin’s chief spokesman. The reason? A Holocaust-themed skating routine. She and her skating partner, actor Andrei Burkovsky, performed the routine as part of the Russian...