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Digital Humanities: Bringing History to the Public

This article is the result of a conversation I had over Facebook messaging, in response to this HTTP article on digital humanities (DH). I have been living off campus in the so-called ‘real’ world for over a year now, having completed my MPhil in Renaissance Literature at the University of...

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Is Historical Research Science?

Following my last post regarding the benefits of the historical approach, various conversations with friends and colleagues have encouraged me to further consider the historian’s methodology. One of the main points of discussion is whether historians and historical research can be thought of as objective in the same sense generally intended...

AP Photo, File, http://newsfeed.time.com/2013/04/08/wikileaks-cable-about-margaret-thatcher-calls-future-pm-frightfully-english-a-trifle-patronizing/ 0

Women in Politics: Margaret Thatcher’s Leadership in Context

Margaret Thatcher’s leadership as a woman is a very relevant and important area for historians to study, as it allows us to consider the continuity and change in women’s leadership over the course of the twentieth-century. As we might expect, much literature has been devoted to Thatcher’s pioneering, yet controversial...

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Corbyn, Blair and Emotional History

Before the drama of this weekend unfolded, an article in the Independent commented on the emotional politics of the Labour leadership campaign. Written by a psychiatrist, it cautioned that the characterisation of Jeremy Corbyn’s Leftist ideals as “emotional”, and his opponents’ centrist proposals as “rational”, wilfully fails to acknowledge the...

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The Fourth Crusade: The Crusaders Conquer… Constantinople?

In 1204 the crusading army did the unthinkable – it sacked Constantinople. The conquering of a Christian city, the nucleus of the Byzantine Empire, is an event that has been seen in two different lights. Was it a series of unfortunate, unavoidable occurrences or was it one that was grasped...

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The Art of In-betweenness (间)

As I said in another post on the Ming exhibition at the British Museum, it is not surprising that misinterpretations of ancient Chinese culture and inventions sometimes occur. This is not due to inadequate knowledge, but mostly due to the positionality of the viewer. One is prone to see what...

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A deal with the devil? Why the Soviet Union failed to eradicate nationalism

The elimination of nationalism was one of the USSR’s main stated goals throughout its history. This commitment was largely due to the fundamental clash between communism and nationalism on a theoretical level: they were two political philosophies that should have been incompatible, if implemented in an orthodox manner. However, no...

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A visit to Dachau: managing the past in the present

A web of expectations I have just arrived in Bavaria where I will be spending the next 12 months at the University of Augsburg. It’s a sunny Sunday afternoon at the beginning of August. And, armed with one of the famous “Land tickets” that allow you to go wherever you...

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“A Convenient Stick With Which to Beat the West”: Northern Ireland Under Soviet Eyes

A 1981 ‘Pravda’ article discusses the H-Block hunger strikes The Northern Irish Troubles present a complex narrative to historians. The histories of all sides in the conflict are resplendent with injustices and obfuscations. Yet for contemporary correspondents of anti-Western states, from Tehran to Moscow, the story was tragically simple: a minority...

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What did the Nazis believe in?

Religion in Nazi Germany is not often discussed, but it played an important role in the way the Nazi party and German society viewed and understood their everyday lives. My research involves looking into a specific generation, the Hitler Youth generation, who were children born around 1929 in Nazi Germany....