First World War Women Munition Workers. Source: The Guardian 0

Nothing More Than Photo-Opportunities?

Women’s Work and the First World War Arthur Marwick once argued that the First World War had an emancipatory and liberating effect on women. Since then, historians have revisited and revised this interpretation, arguing that the war was not transformative for women – the change, if any, was slight and...

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The Myth of Galicia: “A Sweet Injection Into Your Mind”

For those of you who are wondering what Galicia is… Galicia no longer exists. As a province of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, it disappeared from the map following the dissolution of the Danube Monarchy in 1918. But it has not been erased from contemporary collective memory and consciousness, nor from the...

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Scholarly Review: E. H. Carr’s ‘The Romantic Exiles’

It’s a strange thing to review a historical study that is itself long in the tooth. Though E.H. Carr is a colossus in the history of, well, history itself, a sceptic might argue that his approach is outdated, his research methods unreliable, and his insights already surpassed. Indeed, Carr was...

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Turning Points: Germany’s National Day

3rd October: Germany’s National Day Twenty-fifteen  is a big year for anniversaries, and nowhere is this more true than in Germany. Besides the ongoing commemoration of the centenary of World War One, 2015 is the 70th anniversary of the end of the Second World War (May 1945). Perhaps even more...

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What’s a Book Worth?

‘What’s A Book Worth’ a brainchild of Mathew Lyons is a campaign attempting to re-realisation the worth of books. The team at HTTP (History to the Public) decided to get involved as well because everyone on the team loves books. A discussion of what is a book worth occurred in our...

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Digital Humanities: Bringing History to the Public

This article is the result of a conversation I had over Facebook messaging, in response to this HTTP article on digital humanities (DH). I have been living off campus in the so-called ‘real’ world for over a year now, having completed my MPhil in Renaissance Literature at the University of...

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Is Historical Research Science?

Following my last post regarding the benefits of the historical approach, various conversations with friends and colleagues have encouraged me to further consider the historian’s methodology. One of the main points of discussion is whether historians and historical research can be thought of as objective in the same sense generally intended...

AP Photo, File, http://newsfeed.time.com/2013/04/08/wikileaks-cable-about-margaret-thatcher-calls-future-pm-frightfully-english-a-trifle-patronizing/ 0

Women in Politics: Margaret Thatcher’s Leadership in Context

Margaret Thatcher’s leadership as a woman is a very relevant and important area for historians to study, as it allows us to consider the continuity and change in women’s leadership over the course of the twentieth-century. As we might expect, much literature has been devoted to Thatcher’s pioneering, yet controversial...

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Corbyn, Blair and Emotional History

Before the drama of this weekend unfolded, an article in the Independent commented on the emotional politics of the Labour leadership campaign. Written by a psychiatrist, it cautioned that the characterisation of Jeremy Corbyn’s Leftist ideals as “emotional”, and his opponents’ centrist proposals as “rational”, wilfully fails to acknowledge the...