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#Somme100 – commemoration or appropriation?

Today marks 100 years since the beginning of the Battle of the Somme in 1916. As the bloodiest battle of the First World War, it still resonates in public memory throughout Europe and worldwide. The battle (in fact a series of connected battles) caused around 419 000 British and 204...

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European Solidarity: Some food for thought

A timely conference at the University of Augsburg in Germany last week (23-25 June) explored the meaning of European solidarity. For three days, scholars from across Europe and the US discussed what European solidarity has meant for Europe, Europeans and the rest of the world since 1800. The Brexit vote...

Rosie the Riveter 0

American Women and the Workplace Post-1945

Women’s social roles in America continued to undergo significant transformations after the Seond World War, particularly in regards to the workplace. This article explores how both single and married American women consolidated and increased their participation in the workforce post-1945. World War Two Women’s increased workforce participation in the Second...

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A Review of Julie Summers’ ‘Fashion on the Ration’

Julie Summers is fast establishing herself as the voice of World War Two’s ‘Home Front’. Fashion on the Ration builds on the success of Summers’ Jambusters, which tells the story of the Women’s Institute during World War Two. She explores the wear and tear of the war years in Britain...

Leisure and Play Ad 0

[CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS] Leisure and Play in History

During the summer months our public history project, historytothepublic.org (HTTP) is exploring the theme of ‘Leisure and Play’ in history. The topics should have a historical link, but we welcome articles from all disciplines. We are looking for new writers who have a passion for sharing their research on any...

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Working in the Radio Archives

50 years ago, radio was people’s main source of entertainment and information. Tuning in was easier than reading the paper and more common than watching TV. Historians today cannot afford to ignore that fact. But radio archives remain a little known and underused resource. What do they have to offer?...

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Reading Cemeteries

In the postmodern world, one dies alone – away from the eyes of society at large. The emergence of ‘memory cultures’ seems to have marked the end of historically shaped ‘grief cultures’. Burial traditions have taken on new forms that reflect contemporary attitudes, needs and fears. However, in earlier times, dying represented an...

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How do you organise your research?

Are you organising your research efficiently? This question may come up more rarely than not, but it is something all researchers ought to think about actively. Are you organising your source material in the most effective way? Even if you have an amazing filing system (or lackthereof), it is always...