Category: Nuts and bolts

“Nuts and bolts”: using software(!): Zotero etc.

Marathon runner 0

A Historian’s Reflections on writing up, editing, and finishing your PhD

I have not formally announced anything about finishing my thesis draft on social media. My family, whenever they call or message me, hesitantly ask, “So…how’s your thesis?” I grumble a non-committal response with a sigh. Many of my friends, who are also writing up, have written enthusiastic statuses about having...

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How do you organise your research?

Are you organising your research efficiently? This question may come up more rarely than not, but it is something all researchers ought to think about actively. Are you organising your source material in the most effective way? Even if you have an amazing filing system (or lackthereof), it is always...

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Using Multiple Factor Analysis for Historical Research

In humanities research projects, big data is the next big thing. Where I study, at UCL, there is an entire department devoted to digital humanities. I don’t fully understand the relationship between the DH department and the history and German departments – all I know is that I want to experiment with big data methodologies in...

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The World of Academic Conferencing

In May of last year, an article in the New York Times deconstructed the world of academic conferencing in the humanities – these regular, rather intense meetings, in more or less exotic locations, intended to enable academics to discuss their research and network. Highlighting the gap between these noble goals...

LaTeX 0

LaTeX Q&A: part 2

This is a continuation of the previous LaTeX Question and Answer post by Richard Gunning (RG) and Tiia Sahrakorpi (TS). Here we probe the problems and best practises of LaTeX to writing a PhD dissertation. TS: ShareLatex has a huge number of dissertation templates–there is one for UCL, Cambridge, Oxford...

LaTeX 0

Three ways historians can use LaTeX

As we have previously written about how historians may go about using LaTeX, today our focus is on the stumbling stones and problems historians may have with using the software. Richard Gunning (RG) and Tiia Sahrakorpi (TS) probe the problems and best practises of LaTeX to writing a PhD dissertation....

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LaTeX: a scientist’s trade secret to writing

This article aims to let historians into a little trade secret for writing kept by scientists—LaTeX. LaTeX, pronounced «Lah-tech» or «Lay-tech», is a popular document preparation system and document markup language. In a similar vein to our previous History to the Public article on Markdown, this article will serve as...