Category: Research

Iman Khalifeh 0

Who was Imane Khalifeh, the Unsung Peacemaker of the Lebanese Civil War?

Since March is Women’s History Month, what better time of year to write a piece highlighting the contributions of pioneering women without risking being branded an undercover feminist agent? There is a huge debate on the definition of feminism and its concepts, but most importantly, Women’s History Month reminds us...

0

Privileged from the Needle: Obstacles to Early Modern Scholarly Women

When asked what the topic of my PhD is, I usually answer (not very snappily) “British early modern women philosophers”. Obviously, it’s a bit more complicated than that. However, the women I’m studying are little enough known that that usually suffices: women philosophers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries tend...

0

The History of Responsibility in Jacques Derrida’s The Gift of Death

What does it mean to be responsible? This is a question which comes comes undone in Jacques Derrida’s The Gift of Death, which demonstrates that the history of responsibility …. since being responsible to a particular other entails prioritizing that other over countless others, it follows that responsibility to the...

0

National Redefinitions Amid Shifting Boundaries: The German–Polish Border in Context

Unsurprisingly, the establishment of the new German–Polish border at Potsdam in 1945 had a lasting and inflammatory impact on relations between the two peoples. More profound, however, was the way in which it shaped the internal political and social development of both Poland and the emergent German Democratic Republic (GDR)....

0

Reluctant Heritage? Revisiting museums and memory sites in Central and Eastern Europe

The conference Reluctant Heritage:  Revisiting museums and memory sites in Central and Eastern Europe from a transnational perspective, which took place in Bucharest from 4–5 November 2016 associated with the international research project ‘Museums and Controversial Collections’, questioned the role of museums and memory sites in a post-dictatorial context. We...

0

Imperial rivalry and the story of Europe’s grand shopping streets

Today, Regent Street is one of the most iconic streets in London, known for imposing neoclassical buildings built along a sweeping curve that houses an international blend of shops and attracts an international blend of customers. Equally famous is Paris’s Rue de Rivoli, a long avenue of shops stretching from...

0

Inside out, or a look at history of emotions

Emotions are hard. Pixar attempted to make this easier with Inside Out (2015), by creating characters to represent and interpret our base emotions (anger, sadness, joy, fear, and disgust). But in one hundred or five hundred years, what will this film tell future generations about how we experienced, understood and...

0

Cooking from the Middle Ages to the Present Day

We need to eat to survive and this is cooking’s primary purpose. But cooking is not only a matter of survival; it is also a social practice and key part of our cultural heritage. Recipes and cookbooks, as well as historical literature, testify to this. Medieval feasts in particular were...

0

Being Volksdeutsch in Poland: Research Poster

This poster, titled “Being Volksdeutsch in Poland – Volksdeutsch-Polish Children in Upper Silesia in an Age of Extremes”, is a visual outline for my PhD project based at the University of Silesia. This research is part of the H2020 Marie Curie Innovative Training Network CHIBOW – Children Born of War....

0

Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Perpetration, Complicity and Collaboration: Conference Report

On 21 October 2016, the Centre for Collective Violence, Holocaust and Genocide Studies at UCL, with the support of the IAS Octagon Small Grants Fund, organised the one-day workshop on ‘Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Perpetration, Complicity, and Collaboration in Nazi-dominated Europe’. In the past two decades, research into perpetrators, collaborators, and...