Category: Research

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Early Modern England: A Literate Culture?

In the late 15th century, the printing press came to England. Whilst initially its trade remained small and concentrated in the hands of a few, its rapid expansion throughout the Early Modern period transformed English society, rendering ‘literature culture’ important to everyday life. However, the true extent to which literature...

THE DEVONSHIRE, or Most Approved Method of Securing Votes', by Thomas Rowlandson 0

The 1784 Election: Masculinity in Crisis?

The 1784 election contest for the constituency of Westminster was one of the most hotly contested in history, ‘forty days of riot, forty days of confusion’ in the words of Pitt the Younger . Aged only 24, Prime Minister Pitt tried to snatch Westminster from the hands of self-proclaimed ‘man...

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Dream of the Red Chamber: Translating Chinese Literature

From the 1950s to the 1970s, many translation projects of Chinese works were supported by the authority of mainland China. Translators and western experts were invited to join these projects. Among them was a very well-known translator: Yang Xianyi (杨宪益). Over the course of his career, Yang contributed more than...

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Holocaust Memory and Online Shaming

In November, I shared my thoughts on what social media can do for contemporary research on Holocaust consciousness. These “slippery” historical sources – always in flux – help everyday people to express themselves and their engagement with the history of the Holocaust; yet they often present ethical complications. I am...

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Revisiting the History of Oral Contraceptives

Women’s health is a crucial part of women’s history, and the birth control pill represents a technology that has changed the lives of women internationally since its creation. After initially coming on the market in the 1960s, oral contraceptives quickly became a bestseller throughout the United States. In America, the...

Iman Khalifeh 0

Who was Imane Khalifeh, the Unsung Peacemaker of the Lebanese Civil War?

Since March is Women’s History Month, what better time of year to write a piece highlighting the contributions of pioneering women without risking being branded an undercover feminist agent? There is a huge debate on the definition of feminism and its concepts, but most importantly, Women’s History Month reminds us...

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Privileged from the Needle: Obstacles to Early Modern Scholarly Women

When asked what the topic of my PhD is, I usually answer (not very snappily) “British early modern women philosophers”. Obviously, it’s a bit more complicated than that. However, the women I’m studying are little enough known that that usually suffices: women philosophers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries tend...

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The History of Responsibility in Jacques Derrida’s The Gift of Death

What does it mean to be responsible? This is a question which comes comes undone in Jacques Derrida’s The Gift of Death, which demonstrates that the history of responsibility …. since being responsible to a particular other entails prioritizing that other over countless others, it follows that responsibility to the...

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National Redefinitions Amid Shifting Boundaries: The German–Polish Border in Context

Unsurprisingly, the establishment of the new German–Polish border at Potsdam in 1945 had a lasting and inflammatory impact on relations between the two peoples. More profound, however, was the way in which it shaped the internal political and social development of both Poland and the emergent German Democratic Republic (GDR)....