Category: Research

General Research

Intellectual history for beginners 0

Intellectual History for Beginners

This article is intended for graduate students and young researchers who have just started to take an interest in intellectual history or are considering dipping their toe into the subject. This is neither a scholarly article nor a condensed lesson on the subject; this article simply highlights the necessary preliminary...

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Research Meets Real Life

As a history PhD student, I have come to realise that my work, as thoroughly researched, as beautifully written, and as wonderfully entertaining as it is (at least to me) will likely never be read by the general public. The creation of outlets for snippets of interesting history such as...

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An Important Lady: Gertrude Bell in Iraq

November 26, 2017. One hundred years ago to the day, The Manchester Guardian published the contents of an agreement between England and France (ratified by Russia) that divided the Middle East into European zones of influence. This treaty (which would become known as the Sykes-Picot Treaty of 1916) directly contradicted...

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The Land of the Post-Modern

The Pole Andrzej Stasiuk and the Ukrainian Juri Andruchowycz, both born in 1960, are two of the most read contemporary writers from Central and Eastern Europe. Their works have been translated into many languages and they have close contacts in the West, particularly Germany. At first glance, their success seems...

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On the importance of local history

This summer holiday I have read 156 copies of my local paper on microfilm. Amidst the tedium of adverts for a brand new Asda, celebrations of newly-weds and asbestos scandals, the local Gazette has given me an invaluable insight into the relationship between local and national politics in the 1980s....

Francesco Orilia, “Cuccagna arch of bread, cheese, and sucking pigs, made in honor of Duke Antonio Alvarez di Toledo, Viceroy of Naples, on the Feast of Saint John the Baptist, 23 June 1629” (1630) Source: Hyperallergic.com 0

Food Arches and Early Modern Court Festivals

Court festivals allowed courts to distinguish themselves. They functioned as a ‘ritual performance of omnipotence’, extending the court’s power to a wider audience.  Through ceremony and spectacle, festivals enacted power structures  through theatrical performances. Such performances depended on the deferential presence of courtiers, alongside the wider masses, who gave legitimacy...

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Interpreting Perpetrators

A recent interdisciplinary workshop at UCL, organised by the IAS Centre for Collective Violence, Holocaust and Genocide Studies and funded by the Octagon Small Grants Fund, entitled Interpreting Perpetrators aimed to shed light on some of the issues related to understanding, studying and representing perpetrators. The discussions were based on...

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Kamal Jumblatt’s Intellectual Itinerary

Kamal Jumblatt is best known for being an important leftist leader in Lebanon and the head of its Druze community, a minority religious group generally considered a branch of Shia Islam. From 1943 to 1977, he was elected deputy for the Chouf district in Mount Lebanon, and as a minister...

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An exciting egg

Material culture enables historians to consider critically how courts engaged with diverse audiences. The court existed in multiple forms: as a familial home, social space, and political construct. Rulers were often less concerned with propaganda and more with their ‘fama’, namely their long-term glory and reputation, as opposed to outright...