Category: Popular Culture

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Cinema and History: Leisure Meets Politics

Although the value of film as a primary historical source has long been recognised, especially in light of progress made in digitization techniques, such material is often overlooked in favour of ‘traditional’ documents. With the growth of cinema as a popular leisure time activity from the beginning of the 20th...

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Lore (2012) film review

Lore (2012) is a film that is not only highly emotive, but that also raises unsettling questions. Lore (also the name of the main character) takes us into Germany in early May 1945, as the Allied forces conquer the country and divide it into four sectors. Lore’s family hastily packs...

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Cao Cao: A Villain Hero

As a young girl reading the classic Chinese novel San Guo Yan Yi (三国演义) I always felt great sympathy for Liu Bei, the leader of the Shu-Han kingdom. The novel depicts the battles and adventures of heroes in the Three States Period (208-220 AD) and, as a result of author Luo...

In Search of the Miraculous: Ouspenski and Gurdjieff 65 years on. 0

In Search of the Miraculous: Ouspenski and Gurdjieff 65 years on

In Search of the Miraculous: Fragments of an Unknown Teaching is a central text on the life and works of the once popular Armenian mystic George Gurdjieff. Though now largely forgotten by the Western mainstream, Gurdjieff is an extremely curious, multi-sided figure of late 19th-early 20th century European history. He...

Abominable Bride- Abominable History 0

Sherlock’s ‘The Abominable Bride’: Abominable History?

From the characterisation of female figures such as Mrs Banks in Mary Poppins to the recent Suffragette film, producers have presented women’s suffrage campaigns in a variety of ways. The much-anticipated holiday special of the BBC series Sherlock aired on New Year’s Day, much to many fans’ delight (myself included)....

National Libraries Day 1

Celebrating National Libraries Day

We at HTTP spend (varying) amounts of times in the library. Find out about some of our favourite spots in our post to celebrate National Libraries Day… Tiia I associate different libraries with different memories, or moments of writing, so I often try to find new places for new thoughts...

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Secret Art on Table Tennis Balls and Calabash

If you had a table tennis ball or a small calabash to hand, what would you do with them? You’d probably  bounce the ball against the wall or float the calabash in a pool – but would you try painting with them? As the above picture demonstrates, it’s a breathtaking...

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Can We Understand History Through Fiction?

This holiday I read Anthony Doerr’s Pulitzer Prize winning novel,  All the Light We Cannot See (2014). The book centres around two characters: Werner, a German Nazi youth, and Marie-Laure, a blind French girl. The two face the imminent Second World War from their respective, opposing sides. While Doerr’s work...

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Hardcore History with Dan Carlin

Dan Carlin’s sheer enthusiasm for history is infectious in his podcast, Hardcore History. Rather than trying to convince his viewers that the subject matter is important or interesting, he cleverly asks, why wouldn’t this be interesting to you? I recently discovered his podcasts during my daily commute. Most days, I...