Simon Coll

Role:

Author, Managing Editor

Degrees:

BA in Modern and Medieval Languages (German and Russian) at Churchill College, Cambridge (2011) | MA in History at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES), UCL (2014)

Current Study:

PhD in East German History in the Department of German, UCL

Research Topic:

Nationalism and Postwar Memorialization / Reconciliation in the German Democratic Republic (GDR) and Poland during the Cold War

Research Interests:

Nationalism under communism, Cold War history, Counterfactual history, Oral history, History and video games, Modern Irish history, Science Fiction (also under communism, particularly the works of Arkadii and Boris Strugatskii)

Title of Dissertation:

Social Perspectives on Nationalism, Normalization and East German-Polish Relations, 1949-1989

About Me:

I'm a newly minted historian, intrigued by all things communist, nationalist and science-fictional (and there's far more crossover between those than you might expect). I'm also just as interested in teaching as in research, and am keen to share what I'm studying with as wide and varied an audience as possible.

Website:

http://www.simondcoll.com

Social Links:

Email View twitter profile View facebook profile View  profile on LinkedIn

HTTPer Profile:

http://historytothepublic.org/profile-of-an-httper-simon/
http://historytothepublic.org/profile-of-an-httper-simon/

Professor Penguin? Linux for Academic Historians

The Best Leaders We’ve Never Had? A Review of ‘Prime Minister Corbyn’

‘Hamster shopping’ in East Germany: The Open Border and its Problems

‘Intelligent Failures at the Frontier’? Failure in Academic Life

National Redefinitions Amid Shifting Boundaries: The German–Polish Border in Context

A review of Martin Mevius’ ‘Agents of Moscow’

Down the Rabbit Hole: History and Alternate Reality Games

Anti-intellectualism at the Heart of British National Identity

A Review of David Rieff’s ‘In Praise of Forgetting’

Martyrology and Motherhood: the ‘Polish Mother’ in Postwar National Identity

Posts by author

Professor Tux in the library 0

Professor Penguin? Linux for Academic Historians

The Linux operating system has long been a favourite of computer scientists, security professionals, hackers and server administrators, but those working in the humanities have mostly remained oblivious to its advantages. The system has a great deal to offer the historian, however: philosophically, practically and (crucially) financially. It is in...

Composite feature image for the book 'Prime Minister Corbyn' 0

The Best Leaders We’ve Never Had? A Review of ‘Prime Minister Corbyn’

As we have discussed on this site before, counterfactual history is a very useful, yet undervalued tool of historical analysis. When taken seriously, it offers a unique instrument for measuring the impact of particular events, decisions or personalities, by enabling historians to construct realities in which they did not exist or...

A typical shopping street in the GDR, 1969. 0

‘Hamster shopping’ in East Germany: The Open Border and its Problems

The introduction of visa-free travel on the border between the German Democratic Republic (GDR) and Poland on 1 January 1972 was met with scenes of optimism and celebration in communities throughout the border region. As mentioned in a previous post, the border between these two communist states had been established...

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Postwar Germany and the role of women

When a country returns back to normal after a war ends, there are many changes to the everyday lives of soldiers—and their families. Postwar Germany, virtually razed to the ground during the Second World War, had to not only go through a process of denazification, but also deal with rebuilding...

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Exploring the Cold War via Video Games

Using the Cold War as a theme in video games is nothing new. It has been used as a backdrop for PC games since at least the mid-1980s, and continues to be a popular trope today. The majority of games using the war as source material are strategy games, unsurprisingly,...

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National Redefinitions Amid Shifting Boundaries: The German–Polish Border in Context

Unsurprisingly, the establishment of the new German–Polish border at Potsdam in 1945 had a lasting and inflammatory impact on relations between the two peoples. More profound, however, was the way in which it shaped the internal political and social development of both Poland and the emergent German Democratic Republic (GDR)....

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HTTP Turns 2: Making HTTP Great Again

Yesterday our blog turned two! If it was a child, it would be asking “Why?” all the time; be able to walk, run, and jump with both feet; and, most importantly, climb furniture (instead, we have Muz for that). Last year, we were still learning how to crawl. As a...

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A review of Martin Mevius’ ‘Agents of Moscow’

As we have discussed before, the link between nationalism and communism has often been misconstrued by historians and social scientists alike over the past quarter century. While the two are theoretically incompatible, in practice they are often mutually dependent, and no communist state has ever been able to dispense with...